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January 2013 at Natural History - Spotlight on Botany
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Q?rius Collections
Q?rius Collections. Photo Credit: Copyright Ron Blunt, Ron Blunt Photography
In the Museum

On the Web

Plant Collections in Q?rius
Examine a wide variety of plant specimens up close in Q?rius, the Museum’s new interactive learning space for teens.

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Butterflies + Plants: Partners in Evolution
Discover how natural selection has shaped animals and plants together through their ancient and persistent dependencies and defenses with one another.

More >

Explore Plant Collections on the Web
Visit the Q?rius Collections Browser to view digitized specimens and their records. Create your own digital field book and add specimen records to it.

View digital plant collections >
Visit the Department of Botany's website >

MORE EXHIBITS and EXPERIENCES >
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The Ornaments of Life
Pteropodid bat (Cynopterus sphinx with Ficus sp.) and hummingbird (Eulampis jugularis with Heliconia caribaea). Illustration by Alice Tangerini from The Ornaments of Life.
Pollinators — More Than Just “Ornaments of Life”
Historical Expeditions Project Digitizes Data
In their new book, The Ornaments of Life: Coevolution and Conservation in the Tropics, National Museum of Natural History botanist John Kress and co-author Theodore Fleming assert that the role of flower pollinators and seed dispersers on the planet’s health is much more than just ornamental, and that the value of these species transcends the beauty found in colorful feathers, fur, flowers and fruits.

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The Global Plants Initiative-Historical Expeditions is creating digital data and images of historic specimens from early U.S. expeditions. More than 21,000 fragile botanical specimens collected before 1900 west of the Mississippi have been digitized.

More >
MORE RESEARCH >
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Botany staff with CollectionsResearchers in the National Plant Collection study specimens of algae. Photo: Chip Clark, Smithsonian.
Upcoming Programs in Q?rius
Shaping Humanity: Artist John Gurche Reconstructs Our Long-Lost Ancestors
Special Discount - $20 tickets
Wednesday, January 8, 3:00 - 4:00 p.m.
How Botanical Collections Advance Conservation Action
With experts from the Museum, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Institute for Applied Ecology.
 
Tuesday, January 14, 2:30 - 4:30 p.m.
Botanical Illustration Workshop
With Alice Tangerini, illustrator in the Department of Botany. To register, email munnd@si.edu

Thursday, January 16, 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.
Unearthing Fossil Whales: Smithsonian Science Now Webcast
Join paleontologist Nick Pyenson in this 25-minute live webcast as he uncovers and probes into the evolutionary mysteries contained in fossil whale skeletons. 

View the 2014 Smithsonian Science Now webcast schedule >

More programs >
Evening Seminar
Thursday, January 9 - 6:45 p.m.

Anthropologists study our early ancestors. John Gurche introduces them to us face to face. Learn how he sculpts forensically accurate and hauntingly realistic representations of our human forbears.

To receive the discount price for tickets ($20) to this event, log into SmithsonianAssociates.org using the Promo Code 201796 to purchase your discounted tickets.

You must log in before adding tickets to your cart to view any discounted ticket prices. If you do not already have an account with SmithsonianAssociates.org, please create one.

Purchase Tickets >
Live Butterfly Pavilion NOW @ IMAX
Come in from the cold and take a stroll among live butterflies and tropical plants in the Butterfly Pavilion - a fee-based, live butterfly experience.

Learn more >
Jerusalem 3D
Titans of the Ice Age 3D
Flight of the Butterflies 3D
Ultimate Wave 3D

View complete show times for the Johnson IMAX Theater here >
MORE EVENTS >
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Youth Volunteers
A volunteer talks with students during “Forensic Mysteries,” a Q?rius school program. Photo by Jim DiLoreto, Smithsonian.
Volunteer Opportunities Support Your Museum
Are you a life-long learner? Interested in nature? Curious? Join our dynamic community of volunteers in Q?rius, the Smithsonian’s new learning environment.

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SI Volunteer Transcription: Citizen scientists can now assist with transcription of US Botanical Specimens.

Try it out >
Your donation supports our free educational programs and exhibitions and contributes to ground-breaking research around the world.

Donate now >
MORE WAYS TO GET INVOLVED >
Hummingbird

BANNER IMAGE:

Photograph by John Kress, Smithsonian Institution. A male purple-throated carib hummingbird feeding on the flowers of H. caribaea. Pollinators and frugivores help sustain thousands of acres of tropical forests, which act as carbon sinks and help mitigate the impacts of climate change on the Earth.

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